News

SCIPP PI Speaks About Hurricane Prep on WBRZ’s Sunday Journal | 5.28.2020

Dr. Barry Keim was featured on WBRZ's Sunday Journal on May 17, 2020.
Dr. Barry Keim was featured on WBRZ’s Sunday Journal on May 17, 2020.

SCIPP PI and Louisiana State Climatologist Dr. Barry Keim was featured on WBRZ’s Sunday Journal on May 17, 2020. Keim spoke about hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, preparing for the 2020 hurricane season in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, and gave a salute to former Louisiana State Climatologist Dr. Robert Muller, who passed away in March 2020.

New Publication on Extreme Hourly Precipitation Time Series in the Southeastern United States | 5.27.2020

SCIPP researchers at LSU, Dr. Vincent Brown and Dr. Barry Keim, along with Dr. Alan Black at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, recently published “Trend Analysis of Multiple Extreme Hourly Precipitation Time Series in the Southeastern United States” in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. The research complements a previous manuscript published by the same authors titled “Climatology and Trends in Hourly Precipitation for the Southeast United States” (Journal of Hydrometeorology in August 2019) and highlights changes in extreme hourly precipitation time series. During the study period (1960-2017), the annual magnitude of the greatest 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18- hourly periods did not show many spatially congruent or significant trends, revealing that the single biggest annual hourly precipitation events did not change in magnitude in the region across the 50 weather stations that were analyzed. However, the magnitude of annual hourly 90th percentile events did show increasing trends significant at 36% of the sites analyzed, shown in the figure below. This demonstrates that while the single biggest events in a year did not change, hourly magnitudes of lesser, yet still heavy, events are increasing at some stations in the Southeast United States. The study also highlights changes in the longest hourly precipitation events and dry spell durations in the region.

Trends (1960–2017) in annual (a) 90th percentile value, (b) average dry spell duration, and (c) maximum wet period. Darker-green arrows represent increasing trends that are significant at the p ≤ 0.05 level; smaller lighter-green arrows represent increasing trends that are significant at the 0.05 ≤ p ≤ 0.10 level. Large darker-red arrows represent decreasing trends that are significant at the p ≤ 0.05 level; smaller red arrows represent decreasing trends at the 0.05 ≤ p ≤ 0.10 level. Black dots represent insignificant stations. Source: Brown et al. (2020).
Trends (1960–2017) in annual (A) 90th percentile value, (B) average dry spell duration, and (C) maximum wet period. Darker-green arrows represent increasing trends that are significant at the p ≤ 0.05 level; smaller lighter-green arrows represent increasing trends that are significant at the 0.05 ≤ p ≤ 0.10 level. Large darker-red arrows represent decreasing trends that are significant at the p ≤ 0.05 level; smaller red arrows represent decreasing trends at the 0.05 ≤ p ≤ 0.10 level. Black dots represent insignificant stations. Source: Brown et al. (2020).

New Publication: August 2016 South-Central Louisiana Rainfall Event | 5.26.2020

SCIPP researchers at Louisiana State University Dr. Vincent Brown and Dr. Barry Keim recently published a paper focused on the historic August 10-14, 2016 rain event that struck south-central Louisiana. The manuscript titled “How Rare Was the August 2016 South-Central Louisiana Heavy Rainfall Event?”, was published in the April 2020 issue of the Journal of Hydrometeorology. The spatiotemporal pattern of precipitation produced by the August 2016 extreme rainfall event is examined. Brown and Keim used the Storm Precipitation Analysis System (SPAS), a software product owned by Applied Weather Associates (AWA), and found that an area roughly 5000 mi2 received approximately 18.3 inches of precipitation in only 96 hours. SPAS also revealed that one location likely received over 34 inches of rain during the event, aligning well with a measured gauge value of 31.39 inches that occurred in 48-hours, a record for Louisiana. The manuscript details the synoptic setting of the event and uses recurrence intervals to help place the storm in a historical context. For example, two areas north and northeast of Baton Rouge, Louisiana received 6-hour rainfall amounts that corresponded to a greater than 1000-yr event.

Total storm rainfall isohyets generated by the Storm Precipitation Analysis System (SPAS) across southern Louisiana during August 10-14, 2016 (Brown and Keim, 2020).
Total storm rainfall isohyets generated by the Storm Precipitation Analysis System (SPAS) across southern Louisiana during August 10-14, 2016. Source: Brown and Keim (2020).

Route Fifty Navigator Award | 12.3.2019

Congratulations to SCIPP Deputy Director Rachel Riley who was awarded the 2019 Route Fifty Navigator Award in the Tech Innovators category. Riley, along with collaborators Paula Dennison and Rob Hill from the City of Stillwater, Oklahoma, received the award at a ceremony on November 20 in San Antonio, Texas. The award was given for “developing the Simple Planning Tool for planners and emergency managers to assess the local, long-tern climate risks in Oklahoma communities.” SCIPP developed the Simple Planning Tool because of the needs expressed by local, regional and state planners and emergency managers at workshops in 2017 and 2018.

The awards ceremony took place during the National League of Cities’ Summit. Awards were given across five categories: The Electeds, The Leaders, The Next Generation, The Tech Innovators, and The Allies. More details about the rest of the winners are available here. The Route Fifty awards honor individuals and teams who work in or with state, county and municipal governments across the United States.

Rachel Riley, Paula Dennison and Rob Hill receiving the award from Alisha Powell Gillis, Route Fifty Senior Editor.
Paula Dennison, Rachel Riley and Rob Hill receiving the award from Alisha Powell Gillis, Route Fifty Senior Editor.

Simple Planning Tool Wins Award | 10.22.2019

SCIPP’s Simple Planning Tool (SPT) for Oklahoma Climate Hazards received the Oklahoma Chapter of the American Planning Association’s (APA) 2019 award for Outstanding Public Outreach, Program, Project, Tool, or Community Initiative. The award category emphasizes results and demonstrates how innovative and state-of-the-art planning methods and practices help create communities of lasting value. Jurors from Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas, North Carolina, and Vermont reviewed all of the award nominations. The award was presented at the Quad State APA conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma on October 10, 2019. Rachel Riley accepted the award on behalf of SCIPP. Paula Dennison, Assistant City Manager for the City of Stillwater and Rob Hill, Director of Emergency Management for the City of Stillwater were key practitioners involved in the development of the SPT and nominated the tool for the award. Mr. Hill joined Ms. Riley at the awards gala to accept the award.

Rob Hill and Rachel Riley receive the award from APA Oklahoma President Danielle Barker.
Rob Hill and Rachel Riley receive the award from APA Oklahoma President Danielle Barker.

The SPT was developed in 2017 and 2018 through collaborations with planners and emergency managers across the state of Oklahoma. There is also a version for Arkansas that was developed collaboratively with planners and emergency managers in that state. More information about the SPT can be found here.